Becoming

What better way to initiate a series than with this bit of Rumi’s poetry?

Think of the rose, become the rose.
Think of the nightingale, become the nightingale.


Vedi la rosa, divieni la rosa,
Vedi l’usignolo, divieni l’usignolo.

~Rumi

The Landscape Changes, But Do We?

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: This was written in 2010, and is still highly relevant today.


Quite frankly, the photos speak for themselves.

However, for those who prefer words to photos:

Citizens of contemporary Western nations — especially the United States — tend to think of their time and their “civilization” as being the most advanced, the most civilized, and indestructible.

The photo of Kabul in 1970 doesn’t even represent the pinnacle of Afghanistan’s cultural, scientific, and spiritual heights, which many would argue came long before Afghanistan was colonized by the British or adapted “modern” Western ways. But the photo from 1970 shows a landscape reduced to rubble by what only can be called inhumanity. This inhumanity manifests in many ways, including war, greed, corruption, rape, abuse of power, abuse of people, and general “uncaring”.

Consider the cultures of ancient India, China, South America, Central America, Persia, and, of course, Rome and the other civilizations of the ancient and modern “Western World” (for so many years, the only countries included in history classes in the United States).

How many advanced cultures have fallen? How many will, unless we humans start treating our world and all our people with respect and compassion, embrace humility, accept diversity, and act with integrity and kindness?

These photos are from the Finnish website Kuvaton, which claims no copyright to images published on the site.

Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: Written in 2009 to celebrate a ground-breaking international document, the ideals of which we still work to attain. The Declaration was signed on December 10, 1948.


Sixty-one years ago, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Much contested and debated at the UN before its acceptance, the UDHR was developed as a non-binding agreement of nations working towards and upholding basic human rights for all individuals around the world.

Eleanor Roosevelt, a key player driving the drafting and acceptance of the UDHR, stated that the document would educate people as to their basic rights as humans and encourage nations to adopt laws promoting and safeguarding essential human rights.

In April, 1948, ER wrote in Foreign Affairs:

In the first place, we have put into words some inherent rights. Beyond that, we have found that the conditions of our contemporary world require the enumeration of certain protections which the individual must have if he is to acquire a sense of security and dignity in his own person. The effect of this is frankly educational. Indeed, I like to think that the Declaration will help forward very largely the education of the peoples of the world.

Sadly, many rights specified in the document are still far from being universal, and adoption of the UDHR continues to meet opposition from number of governments around the globe. And, while ER and the United Nations consider the document to be personal and “belong to each and every one of us — [to] read it, learn it, promote it and claim it as your own”, the rights enunciated in the UDHR are not so well known, even by those here in the US — the home of the Constitution that provided a strong foundation for the drafting of the UDHR.

How familiar are you with the UDHR?

At a very basic level, the Declaration covers the following:

  • Protecting children’s rights
  • Fighting discrimination
  • Halting torture and political killings
  • Advancing the human rights of women
  • Reinforcing workers’ rights
  • Spreading the word of free expression
  • Halting religious persecution
  • Advocating for fair trials and due process
  • Securing freedom from want for all
  • Protecting human rights defenders

On this Human Rights Day, take the step of educating yourself as well as helping others. Visit the following sites to learn more about the UDHR and human rights:

While the technology of the world has changed drastically since 1948, attitudes and the implementation of policies safeguarding human rights have not changed much. The UDHR is as critical now as it was 61 years ago. The peoples of the world must move beyond the document, and implement universal acceptance of human rights, as human rights are timeless — and priceless.

Photo by SpecialKRB, via Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

Elinor Ostrom’s Commons Sense

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I wrote this piece in 2009, after Elinor Ostrom won the Nobel Prize for Economics. The article was published by eZine Articles and also on my previous blog, Pointing to the Moon.


Elinor Ostrom’s award-winning economic theories about sharing resources are in part based on lessons learned from observing how Swiss farmers determine grazing rights for common-pasture cows.

Elinor Ostrom, co-recipient of this year’s Nobel Laureate in Economics, has been the subject of a flurry of media excitement, yet the attention given Ostrom and her work is only beginning: As more people begin to understand what Ostrom has said, the influence of her words and work will be felt more greatly – especially by women.The benefit will not come because Ostrom is the first woman awarded the Nobel for Economics – a fact the highlighted by the press during initial reports of the award, most likely because of lack of publically-known information about Ostrom and her work. As the media and public have shifted from focusing on “the first woman” to actually looking at Ostrom’s contributions to economics, the practicality of what she says has become apparent. Reporters, writers, and the public are beginning to understand Ostrom’s work and realize how vital it is to the world right now.

The commons – commonly-shared resources, from pastures to oceans – and how they are shared and sustained are a focal point of Ostrom’s work. Unlike many economists and politicians, Ostrom believes that most people challenged with the distribution and use of a resource can cooperate and act for the common good. Ostrom believes problems should be solved as locally as possible, yet she does not denounce the need for government.

Ostrom’s findings are a departure from what has been the prevailing force in economics: For centuries, economists have focused on lack, and control of resources by a few. Common resources were thought to be best handled if divided and distributed by a superior and controlling power. Traditional economic theories have led to imperialism, competition, scarcity for many, gross over-abundance for a few, wars of resource control, and a rapidly declining environment.

In a discipline dominated by men, Ostrom’s emphasis on empowering groups and letting them work out practical, applicable, sustainable solutions for resource use is ground-breaking. Ostrom’s consideration of the community as well as the individual, and her call for cooperation at the local group level is surprising – in a discipline dominated by men. To women, I don’t think Ostrom’s work is so radical: In fact, I would say that Ostrom’s work stems from being a woman.

By nature, women tend to recognize and value inter-dependencies, between and among individuals and the community. Women strive to balance and sustain fair use of resources, and encourage self-dependence and situational problem-solving rather than the imposition predetermined, rigid rules.

The women’s perspective and presence has been squelched in modern economics, and I believe this has been a major cause of the many crises we face. An over-emphasis on hyper-masculine qualities, including competition, winning, me-or-you allocation of resources, and focus on short-term gain has brought the world to the brink of financial and environmental collapse.

Ostrom’s work and ideas are intellectually credible and grounded in practicality, and the Nobel award gives her words a validity respected beyond academic circles. The Nobel award committee chooses recipients not only to commend them for their work, but to focus media and the public eye on issues the committee feels demand global attention. Public perception and actions can be and are changed by the designation of the award. In this case, the Nobel committee has consciously directed attention to the need for a more cooperative, inclusive, sustainable, and self-directed world economy – one that recognizes and includes women as determinants, not as derivatives.

Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel prize gives credibility to what women already, inherently, know, and men are beginning to recognize, value, and seek. Ostrom has opened the door for evolutionary economic change, and the increased inclusion of women in government, businesses, and economic decision-making processes will facilitate that change – and demand women’s active participation.

Photo by Juan Flauta, via FlickrCC BY 2.0

The Road Less Traveled: A Business Owner Profile

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I wrote this profile of a Denver business owner for a women’s magazine in 2004.

Over the years, I have done many interviews and profiles, both in print and in video. Some were published under my byline; some were used without byline or credit in promotional materials for businesses and nonprofits, or kept for an organization’s archival purposes.

The profiles I most like were — and are— those featuring amazing and inspiring women. The piece below is perhaps my favorite profile from those I wrote about Denver business owners. I had known Qui Vu for a year or so before this was written, yet interviewing and filming her for the piece brought me to tears: Her quiet courage, fortitude, peace, and inspiration were evident in all she did, and touched all those in her life.

Originally published in Zenith Women’s Magazine, March/April 2004.

Ensure Your Audience Understands: Clarifying a Technical Message

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I wrote this in 2014 to demonstrate how a tech company could better communicate an important update and action needed to their clients.

The first set of materials below shows the original letter and technical instructions a web hosting company sent to clients. The message is confusing, especially because the person who would likely receive the letter would not be the same person actually doing the work and therefore following the instructions.

The second set of items is my improved version: A letter targets the person who would receive the initial communication; the instructions are illustrated and written for the person who would be doing the work; and the FAQ’s are both more detailed and simplified. The updated communication addresses different roles, different needs, and is clearer for recipients.

Names and links have been omitted for privacy, and the formatting is not exact here.

Original Letter Before Revision

Dear Valued Customer,

We’re writing to inform you of an important change in your server’s default configuration that may affect your websites. The default version of PHP employed by our servers will be updated to PHP 5.4 on 5/8/2014. We will be attempting to automatically detect the compatibility of YourSite.com and any other add-on domains you have, but we want to ask you to please log into your cPanel and test all of your sites using PHP 5.4 by following the directions given in this article: SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

FAQ‘s

1) Why are you making this change?

The default version of PHP that our servers are currently utilizing; PHP 5.2 ; has been deprecated for some time. As such, we would like to see your sites enjoying the security and performance benefits of the newer versions of PHP which we already have available on your server.

2) How can I make sure my sites will work?

While we are taking every possible step to try and automatically assign the right version to all of your scripts, we do want to ask you to please login into your cPanel and test all of your sites using PHP 5.4 yourself. Here’s a more detailed explanation on how to test this using our plugin available via cPanel.

The default behavior of your account is for PHP settings to be inherited by sub-directories. That means that you can easily test all of your site’s compatibility with PHP 5.4, by setting the PHP handler for your home directory for your account to PHP 5.4. Then simply test your websites by opening them in your browser. To test this using our plugin please do the following:

* Login to your cPanel at https://host.1000.Webhost.com/cpanel

* Click on the “PHP Configuration” icon, which can be found under the “Advanced” group of icons in cPanel.

* From the drop-down of Available PHP handlers, please select “PHP 5.4” without changing the target directory from the current setting.

It should be displaying / (Current Folder). Click on “Update”

* You should see a confirmation message that reads: The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 54 for this account. Clicking on “Back” you should now notice the dropdown listing PHP 5.4 as the active Handler

* At this point you will want to test your sites by opening them in your browser. If you do not notice any issues or visible errors, this means your sites are compatible with PHP 5.4 and you do not need to perform any further actions to ensure they continue to work once the PHP upgrade is performed. You will simply want to leave the Handler that was just set as the active one without any other changes.

* If on the other hand, you do notice issues during your test with your sites and the PHP 5.4 Handler that was enabled, you can then simply toggle the active Handler via our plugin and set it to use “PHP 5.2”. This should set your account to specifically use the the current

default version of PHP in our servers and ensure they continue to use this version once the PHP upgrade process is performed. Our upgrade process is set to honor the current Handler settings you set via this plugin to ensure your scripts continue to work once the upgrade is completed. Please note: Selecting “No custom Handler (Sys Default)”, will NOT ensure your account stays using PHP 5.2 once the PHP upgrade iscomplete. While PHP 5.2 is currently the system default version, once the upgrade is complete, the default version will be PHP 5.4. If your applications require PHP 5.2 you will want to make sure to specifically select the “PHP 5.2” option.

3) Will my site’s experience any down time?

The switch between PHP versions is simply a configuration change in your .htaccess file(s) as such, there is no maintenance which must be performed on the server itself that would cause any service outages. Applications that are not compatible with PHP 5.4 will fail to load properly once the change is performed. While we will make every effort to automatically perform compatibility checks for each accounts and set the appropriate Handler, it’s imperative for you to please do the compatibility tests from your end as well using the steps listed above, before 5/8/2014 .

4) Who can help me update my site/script to use a newer version of PHP?

While we can assist you with changing the version of PHP your script utilizes, we will not be able to recode your site to be compatible with newer versions of PHP. You should contact the script’s author/developer to inquire as to whether or not they currently have or plan to re-design their code to utilize later versions of PHP.

————-

Best Regards,

Firstname Lastname


Revised Letter, General Overview, Instructions, and FAQs

Letter

Dear Website Owner, 

We’d like to ask you (or your web developer) to run a quick test to make certain your website continues to look and function the way it’s designed. 

We’re making an upgrade to our system, and the upgrade may affect some websites, particularly if they were last updated or built before January 2011. 

The test will indicate if the upgrade would affect your website. 

If you run the test and find the upgrade would affect your website, you can easily reject the upgrade by changing one setting on the Webhost control panel (CPanel). 

Instructions, more information, and frequently asked questions (FAQs) are below. 

If you are not the web developer who will conduct the brief test, or apply any necessary changes, please forward this email to the appropriate person who handles these tasks for you!

If you have questions, please check out the FAQs and support links and phone numbers below.

Thanks, 

Webhost Support Team

General Overview

Webhost’s default servers will be upgraded to a new version of PHP (5.4) on May 8, 2014. We’ll attempt to determine if your website and any add-on domains are compatible with the upgrade by running an automated check. However, we’d like you to test compatibility yourself, before the upgrade, because you know how your website is designed to look and function, and may notice issues our automated program does not.

If you experience issues when you run the test, you have the option of choosing not to accept the upgrade. 

Instructions Overview

Detailed instructions follow this overview. 

To give you a brief overview of the steps to test your website for compatibility, you will:

  • Log into your Control Panel (CPanel) for your home directory
  • Set the PHP handler to the new version of PHP
  • Open your website(s) in a browser
  • Access each page (in each) of your website(s) to check for any visible or functional changes or errors
  • If you do NOT encounter issues on your website(s), your websites are compatible with the upgrade, and no further action is necessary
  • If you DO encounter issues on your website(s), you can decline the PHP upgrade by setting the PHP handler to continue using the current PHP version 5.2

Instructions: Testing Compatibility

  1. Click this link, or copy and paste into your browser, to open the Control Panel: SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL
  2. Scroll down to the Advanced section.
  3. Click PHP Configuration to open the PHP Configuration window. 
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  1. Click the drop-down arrow.
  2. Select PHP 5.4.
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  1. Verify you see the confirmation message: “The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 5.4 for this account” in the new window.
  2. Click Back on the browser bar.
  3. Verify you see “The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 5.4” in the PHP Configuration window.
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  1. Open your website(s) in a browser.
  2. Access and view each page in each of your websites.
  3. Check for any visible or functional changes or errors.

If you do NOT encounter issues on your website

  1. You do not need to do anything further. If you still have the CPanel open, click the Logout icon in the upper right corner of the CPanel window to log out of the CPanel. You’re done!
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If you DO encounter issues on your website

  1. Return to the CPanel PHP Configuration Page (if the CPanel is no longer open, follow steps 1 through 3 under Instructions: Testing Compatibility).
  2. Click the drop-down arrow.
  3. Select PHP 5.2 to set your website and add-on domains to use the current version of the PHP handler. Your site(s) will not be affected by the upgrade
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Our upgrade process honors the settings you choose here, so setting your PHP handler to 5.2 essentially declines the upgrade to PHP 5.4. 

Please note: If you want to decline the upgrade and continue using PHP 5.2, DO NOT select “No custom PHP Handler (Sys Default)”. While the System Default (Sys Default) is currently PHP 5.2, once the upgrade is performed, the Sys Default will be PHP 5.4.

  1. If you still have the CPanel open, click the Logout icon in the upper right corner of the CPanel window to log out of the CPanel. You’re done!
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FAQs

Why are you making this change?

We want to bring you the best and most up-to-date software and services available.

Our servers currently use PHP 5.2, which is an deprecated version of PHP that is longer supported. Version 5.2 and does not offer the security and performance improvements found in Version 5.4.

How can I make sure my site(s) will work following the upgrade?

Simple answer: Follow the instructions given above. You can also find the instructions online at SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

Details: If you follow the instructions above, and find your site/scripts do not work with PHP 5.4, as well as declining the upgrade, you could consider rebuilding your site/scripts using newer code/applications/technology.

Will my site(s) experience any down time?

Simple answer: If you have followed the instructions above, your site should not experience any issues or “downtime”.

Details: The switch between PHP versions is simply a configuration change in your .htaccess file(s). There not maintenance performed on the server that would cause any service outages. 

However, websites and scripts incompatible with PHP 5.4 will not load properly once the upgrade is performed, and may experience issues, including issues that prohibit visitors from accessing or using your website properly.

While we perform automatic compatibility checks for each account and attempt to set the PHP handler version automatically for each site, it’s imperative you perform the compatibility test before the upgrade on May 8, 2014 to ensure that your site/scripts work with the upgrade — or that you decline the upgrade. 

Who can help me update my site to use a newer version of PHP?

Simple answer: Your web developer or technical team members.

Details: If you have an older website that has not been updated for some time, you may consider rebuilding the website with newer versions of code, applications, and/or technology. Such an upgrade can improve performance and security as well as help you update the look and functionality of your site for users.

While we can help you change the version of PHP your website uses on our servers, we cannot rebuilt your site to use newer versions of PHP. You must contact the web developer and/or technical team members who built the website.

Where can I find these instructions online?

Go to SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

Support Contacts

  • Chat: Click here
  • Email: Support@webhost.com
  • Phone: 1.888.888.8888

Ancient History: National Columnist, My First Real Job

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: A scan of a piece I wrote for my first real job as a columnist for a national sports publication in the early 1980’s.

A month or so before I graduated high school, I was asked to write a regular column for a regional sports publication that was launching nationally. My only directive was that the column was to be “for junior athletes”. I accepted the offer, mused a bit, and a few weeks later, I sent in my first column — which I had typed on correctable paper using a mechanical typewriter and mailed in a stamped envelope. It was 1980, before personal computers, email, faxes, or cell phones!

A day later I received a call: The publisher wanted to know if I would be available to edit the entire paper, and yes, I would be paid for that as well as my column. After several days of contemplating this additional job offer — a little mind-blowing for a 16-year old kid who already felt in over her head as a “pro athlete”— I decided that the few days a week of driving nearly 60 miles across the metropolis to the newspaper office was not practical. 

Instead, I wrote more for the paper. Lots more. Over the course of two or three years, in addition to my monthly column, I penned so many player profiles, tournament recaps, and other features (and contributed a few not-so-good photos) that I soon insisted the publisher not put my by-line on anything except my column.

Of the dozens of pieces published, I kept only the random column shown below and one feature. I don’t tend to save things, especially my own work, and in the years before scans were easy and photos were digital, I discarded almost all articles I had written that were published in newsprint, and did so without saving a copy. At times I wish I had saved more, as it would be interesting now to read what I had written then!

I do recall that the first column (which is not the one below) stated my ideal for the series: To inspire kids (and adults) to improve themselves, their physical and mental health and well-being, their playing ability, their love of sports, and their lives in general — and to play and live fairly and honestly. I was rather surprised at the number of adults who confided to me that my column was their favorite part of the paper. 

And yes, the first name in the byline and intro paragraph is blurred, as at that time I was called by a variation of the first name I was given at birth. The given name most definitely did not suit me and the nickname did not either. I legally changed my name some years later.

Written sometime between 1980 and 1982.