Celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: Written in 2009 to celebrate a ground-breaking international document, the ideals of which we still work to attain. The Declaration was signed on December 10, 1948.


Sixty-one years ago, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Much contested and debated at the UN before its acceptance, the UDHR was developed as a non-binding agreement of nations working towards and upholding basic human rights for all individuals around the world.

Eleanor Roosevelt, a key player driving the drafting and acceptance of the UDHR, stated that the document would educate people as to their basic rights as humans and encourage nations to adopt laws promoting and safeguarding essential human rights.

In April, 1948, ER wrote in Foreign Affairs:

In the first place, we have put into words some inherent rights. Beyond that, we have found that the conditions of our contemporary world require the enumeration of certain protections which the individual must have if he is to acquire a sense of security and dignity in his own person. The effect of this is frankly educational. Indeed, I like to think that the Declaration will help forward very largely the education of the peoples of the world.

Sadly, many rights specified in the document are still far from being universal, and adoption of the UDHR continues to meet opposition from number of governments around the globe. And, while ER and the United Nations consider the document to be personal and “belong to each and every one of us — [to] read it, learn it, promote it and claim it as your own”, the rights enunciated in the UDHR are not so well known, even by those here in the US — the home of the Constitution that provided a strong foundation for the drafting of the UDHR.

How familiar are you with the UDHR?

At a very basic level, the Declaration covers the following:

  • Protecting children’s rights
  • Fighting discrimination
  • Halting torture and political killings
  • Advancing the human rights of women
  • Reinforcing workers’ rights
  • Spreading the word of free expression
  • Halting religious persecution
  • Advocating for fair trials and due process
  • Securing freedom from want for all
  • Protecting human rights defenders

On this Human Rights Day, take the step of educating yourself as well as helping others. Visit the following sites to learn more about the UDHR and human rights:

While the technology of the world has changed drastically since 1948, attitudes and the implementation of policies safeguarding human rights have not changed much. The UDHR is as critical now as it was 61 years ago. The peoples of the world must move beyond the document, and implement universal acceptance of human rights, as human rights are timeless — and priceless.

Photo by SpecialKRB, via Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.

The Inaugural Business of the Year Awards

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I’ve organized and run many events, and this inaugural event from 1997 was eclipsed as my favorite only by Sardinian Textiles: An Exhibit of Handwoven Art at the Italian Cultural Institute – San Francisco in 2017. 

During the mid-1990’s, I was on the board of directors for the Colorado Business Council, the Denver-area GLBT chamber of commerce. Their name has has since changed; at that time, we could not use the words gay, lesbian, bisexual, or trans in the organization’s name as the homophobia was rampant in Colorado. Even some of the chamber’s leaders were not out in the business world and did not want to be publicly identified with the group.

To better integrate the chamber with the community-at-large and other chambers, gain recognition for gay-owned businesses; promote GLBT issues; and serve as a fund-raiser for the organization, friend Anne, also a board member, came up with the idea of initiating an annual awards ceremony lauding gay- and lesbian-owned businesses and community allies.

The inaugural event in 1997 was a huge success, and the awards ceremony ran for about 15 years before being discontinued due to having achieved its long-term goals. As Elfriede, another friend and former board member said, “The awards and ceremony were phased out because we had been able to honor all of the ground-breaking GLBT business owners, and the chamber and GLBT community has become so well integrated into Denver that having distinct awards for GLBT businesses no longer served any purpose.” 

I was thrilled to hear this: The inaugural ceremony had been a pet project of mine, and I had been credited with taking the event from conception to reality. At the time, I was CBC’s Director of Special Events and de facto PR director, and I did everything I could to ensure the first event’s success. I managed details large and small, created processes that I new would set precedents, penned documents, wrote articles and talked with journalists to secure top local publicity, garnered corporate and business sponsorships, and collaborated with other board members to attract politicians and business leaders to the event and ensure their support of the chamber. The event and people were also a great deal of fun!

A few pieces of the local publicity around the event are below.

The Rocky Mountain News Sunday Business section, August 31, 1997.
Sent as informative article/PR piece to numerous papers; published as-is in some, by my request without my byline.
Feature in the Women’s Business Chronicle, a Colorado paper, April/May 1998.

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.

Why I (Mostly) No Longer Write Satire

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives.

I’ve always had a passion for satire: I devoured the writings of Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw, and S.J. Perelman when I was a kid, and English teachers and friends often urged me to write pieces for them. For a long time I did write short satires, yet I intentionally stopped (well, mostly), long before the current political environment essentially killed the genre by rendering it nearly indistinguishable from so-called reality.

I desisted for several reasons. Writing satire puts me in a bad mood: I become critical, cranky, and unappreciative of the good in the world. I’ve also increasingly believed that our thoughts influence and create our reality, so writing satire generally seems unwise: I’ve had many satirical ideas that I would NOT want to see manifest in world! In addition, the rapid reaction to a piece I wrote and sent to friends and colleagues in 2007 spooked me: Not even my closest friend — whom I thought would recognize my writing — identified the piece as satire, and she and many others began sharing the email, which I thought could land me in major hot water, possibly even a lawsuit, if I did not quickly retract the piece (which I did; keep reading to see the piece below). 

I often structured my satires as newspaper articles or press releases, and sometimes even took the first few sentences of a real newspaper article and wrote a satirical ending to it. This format combined with my extremely dry sense of humor apparently makes it very difficult for people to discern what’s true and what’s not.

Here’s an example of the newspaper format, based on a 2004 article found on the BBC website.

Passion over for Barbie and Ken

Valentine’s Day is approaching, but the romance is over for Barbie and Ken. 

 After 43 years as an item, the plastic pair’s “business manager” at toymaker Mattel said they “feel it’s time to spend some quality time – apart”.

 “Like other celebrity couples, their Hollywood romance has come to an end,” said Russell Arons of Mattel toys. 

Ken will go his own way, and the new romance in Barbie’s life will undoubtedly raise some eyebrows — as will the new Barbie herself.

Barbie will be sporting pants, flat heels, and wearing a ring from her new significant other, who is dark, handsome – and a woman. 

“Woman-loving Barbie has been a long time in waiting,” says Arons. 

Lucia, Barbie’s new partner, was introduced to Barbie’s circle amidst considerable astonishment and excitement.

“The conservatives who haven’t been paying attention will undoubtedly have some strong reactions, but Barbie just couldn’t go on with Ken any longer,” says Arons. “Lucia comes with a full range of emotions, interests and talents that we just couldn’t bundle into Ken or any male doll.”

Mattel will market a full range of new accessories for the lesbian couple, including a pickup truck/camper combination, large furry dogs, and an assortment of Mikita power tools. ###

The piece I retracted (below) was written as a press release during a very snowy winter when planes were delayed and cancelled across the country, with each week bringing a new storm and a new set of delays. Vacationers as well as those of us who flew regularly for work were upset with what seemed like persistent travel difficulties and unaccommodating policies of airlines. I wrote this thinking it so far-fetched that no one would believe it, yet after people began sharing it as a real news piece, I became worried that the airline would find and sue me. 

United Announces Frequent Flier Flight Delay Program

CHICAGO, IL, February 14, 2007 — United Airlines today announced  the company will award frequent flier program miles to travelers whose flights are delayed due to weather. Elite members of the airline’s frequent flier program will also be awarded miles for any flight delays. 
 
“We realize that fliers, especially frequent fliers, lose time and money because of weather delays. This winter has been particularly difficult for travelers and airlines, and United wants to recognize the fortitude and loyalty of our customers,” says Bob Forappel, United public relations director. “We feel there’s no better way to do this than by offering travelers frequent flier miles.”

Travelers who are members of United’s frequent flyer program will receive 5 frequent flier miles for each minute of weather-related delay. Premier members (those who have flown 25,000 miles in the past year) will receive 10 miles for each minute of delay. Premier Executive and Premier 1K members will receive 20 and 50 miles, respectively, for each minute of delay, as well as corresponding miles for any flight delay, weather-related or not.

For more information, see www.united.com/premier/miles/wewish/ ###

While I’ve pretty much stopped writing satire since then, occasional outbreaks occur. See How to Launch a Successful Startup in San Francisco, subtitled Why I (Mostly) No Longer Write Satire, Part II

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.

Ensure Your Audience Understands: Clarifying a Technical Message

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I wrote this in 2014 to demonstrate how a tech company could better communicate an important update and action needed to their clients.

The first set of items is my improved version: A letter targets the person who would receive the initial communication; the instructions are illustrated and written for the person who would be doing the work; and the FAQ’s are both more detailed and simplified. The updated communication addresses different roles, different needs, and is clearer for recipients.

The second set of materials below (in grey text) shows the original letter and technical instructions a web hosting company sent to clients. The message is confusing, especially because the person who would likely receive the letter would not be the same person actually doing the work and therefore following the instructions.

Names and links have been omitted for privacy, and the formatting is not exact here.


Revised Letter, General Overview, Instructions, and FAQs

Letter

Dear Website Owner, 

We’d like to ask you (or your web developer) to run a quick test to make certain your website continues to look and function the way it’s designed. 

We’re making an upgrade to our system, and the upgrade may affect some websites, particularly if they were last updated or built before January 2011. 

The test will indicate if the upgrade would affect your website. 

If you run the test and find the upgrade would affect your website, you can easily reject the upgrade by changing one setting on the Webhost control panel (CPanel). 

Instructions, more information, and frequently asked questions (FAQs) are below. 

If you are not the web developer who will conduct the brief test, or apply any necessary changes, please forward this email to the appropriate person who handles these tasks for you!

If you have questions, please check out the FAQs and support links and phone numbers below.

Thanks, 

Webhost Support Team

General Overview

Webhost’s default servers will be upgraded to a new version of PHP (5.4) on May 8, 2014. We’ll attempt to determine if your website and any add-on domains are compatible with the upgrade by running an automated check. However, we’d like you to test compatibility yourself, before the upgrade, because you know how your website is designed to look and function, and may notice issues our automated program does not.

If you experience issues when you run the test, you have the option of choosing not to accept the upgrade. 

Instructions Overview

Detailed instructions follow this overview. 

To give you a brief overview of the steps to test your website for compatibility, you will:

  • Log into your Control Panel (CPanel) for your home directory
  • Set the PHP handler to the new version of PHP
  • Open your website(s) in a browser
  • Access each page (in each) of your website(s) to check for any visible or functional changes or errors
  • If you do NOT encounter issues on your website(s), your websites are compatible with the upgrade, and no further action is necessary
  • If you DO encounter issues on your website(s), you can decline the PHP upgrade by setting the PHP handler to continue using the current PHP version 5.2

Instructions: Testing Compatibility

  1. Click this link, or copy and paste into your browser, to open the Control Panel: SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL
  2. Scroll down to the Advanced section.
  3. Click PHP Configuration to open the PHP Configuration window. 
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  1. Click the drop-down arrow.
  2. Select PHP 5.4.
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  1. Verify you see the confirmation message: “The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 5.4 for this account” in the new window.
  2. Click Back on the browser bar.
  3. Verify you see “The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 5.4” in the PHP Configuration window.
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  1. Open your website(s) in a browser.
  2. Access and view each page in each of your websites.
  3. Check for any visible or functional changes or errors.

If you do NOT encounter issues on your website

  1. You do not need to do anything further. If you still have the CPanel open, click the Logout icon in the upper right corner of the CPanel window to log out of the CPanel. You’re done!
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If you DO encounter issues on your website

  1. Return to the CPanel PHP Configuration Page (if the CPanel is no longer open, follow steps 1 through 3 under Instructions: Testing Compatibility).
  2. Click the drop-down arrow.
  3. Select PHP 5.2 to set your website and add-on domains to use the current version of the PHP handler. Your site(s) will not be affected by the upgrade
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Our upgrade process honors the settings you choose here, so setting your PHP handler to 5.2 essentially declines the upgrade to PHP 5.4. 

Please note: If you want to decline the upgrade and continue using PHP 5.2, DO NOT select “No custom PHP Handler (Sys Default)”. While the System Default (Sys Default) is currently PHP 5.2, once the upgrade is performed, the Sys Default will be PHP 5.4.

  1. If you still have the CPanel open, click the Logout icon in the upper right corner of the CPanel window to log out of the CPanel. You’re done!
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FAQs

Why are you making this change?

We want to bring you the best and most up-to-date software and services available.

Our servers currently use PHP 5.2, which is an deprecated version of PHP that is longer supported. Version 5.2 and does not offer the security and performance improvements found in Version 5.4.

How can I make sure my site(s) will work following the upgrade?

Simple answer: Follow the instructions given above. You can also find the instructions online at SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

Details: If you follow the instructions above, and find your site/scripts do not work with PHP 5.4, as well as declining the upgrade, you could consider rebuilding your site/scripts using newer code/applications/technology.

Will my site(s) experience any down time?

Simple answer: If you have followed the instructions above, your site should not experience any issues or “downtime”.

Details: The switch between PHP versions is simply a configuration change in your .htaccess file(s). There not maintenance performed on the server that would cause any service outages. 

However, websites and scripts incompatible with PHP 5.4 will not load properly once the upgrade is performed, and may experience issues, including issues that prohibit visitors from accessing or using your website properly.

While we perform automatic compatibility checks for each account and attempt to set the PHP handler version automatically for each site, it’s imperative you perform the compatibility test before the upgrade on May 8, 2014 to ensure that your site/scripts work with the upgrade — or that you decline the upgrade. 

Who can help me update my site to use a newer version of PHP?

Simple answer: Your web developer or technical team members.

Details: If you have an older website that has not been updated for some time, you may consider rebuilding the website with newer versions of code, applications, and/or technology. Such an upgrade can improve performance and security as well as help you update the look and functionality of your site for users.

While we can help you change the version of PHP your website uses on our servers, we cannot rebuilt your site to use newer versions of PHP. You must contact the web developer and/or technical team members who built the website.

Where can I find these instructions online?

Go to SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

Support Contacts

  • Chat: Click here
  • Email: Support@webhost.com
  • Phone: 1.888.888.8888

Original Letter Before Revision

Dear Valued Customer,

We’re writing to inform you of an important change in your server’s default configuration that may affect your websites.

The default version of PHP employed by our servers will be updated to PHP 5.4 on 5/8/2014. We will be attempting to automatically detect the compatibility of YourSite.com and any other add-on domains you have, but we want to ask you to please log into your cPanel and test all of your sites using PHP 5.4 by following the directions given in this article: SAMPLE LINK NONFUNCTIONAL.

FAQ‘s

1) Why are you making this change?

The default version of PHP that our servers are currently utilizing; PHP 5.2 ; has been deprecated for some time. As such, we would like to see your sites enjoying the security and performance benefits of the newer versions of PHP which we already have available on your server.

2) How can I make sure my sites will work?

While we are taking every possible step to try and automatically assign the right version to all of your scripts, we do want to ask you to please login into your cPanel and test all of your sites using PHP 5.4 yourself.

Here’s a more detailed explanation on how to test this using our plugin available via cPanel.

The default behavior of your account is for PHP settings to be inherited by sub-directories. That means that you can easily test all of your site’s compatibility with PHP 5.4, by setting the PHP handler for your home directory for your account to PHP 5.4. Then simply test your websites by opening them in your browser.

To test this using our plugin please do the following:

* Login to your cPanel at https://host.1000.Webhost.com/cpanel

* Click on the “PHP Configuration” icon, which can be found under the “Advanced” group of icons in cPanel.

* From the drop-down of Available PHP handlers, please select “PHP 5.4” without changing the target directory from the current setting.It should be displaying / (Current Folder). Click on “Update”

* You should see a confirmation message that reads: The “.php” file extension will be processed by PHP 54 for this account. Clicking on “Back” you should now notice the dropdown listing PHP 5.4 as the active Handler

* At this point you will want to test your sites by opening them in your browser. If you do not notice any issues or visible errors, this means your sites are compatible with PHP 5.4 and you do not need to perform any further actions to ensure they continue to work once the PHP upgrade is performed. You will simply want to leave the Handler that was just set as the active one without any other changes.

* If on the other hand, you do notice issues during your test with your sites and the PHP 5.4 Handler that was enabled, you can then simply toggle the active Handler via our plugin and set it to use “PHP 5.2”. This should set your account to specifically use the the current default version of PHP in our servers and ensure they continue to use this version once the PHP upgrade process is performed. Our upgrade process is set to honor the current Handler settings you set via this plugin to ensure your scripts continue to work once the upgrade is completed.

Please note: Selecting “No custom Handler (Sys Default)”, will NOT ensure your account stays using PHP 5.2 once the PHP upgrade iscomplete. While PHP 5.2 is currently the system default version, once the upgrade is complete, the default version will be PHP 5.4. If your applications require PHP 5.2 you will want to make sure to specifically select the “PHP 5.2” option.

3) Will my site’s experience any down time?

The switch between PHP versions is simply a configuration change in your .htaccess file(s) as such, there is no maintenance which must be performed on the server itself that would cause any service outages. Applications that are not compatible with PHP 5.4 will fail to load properly once the change is performed. While we will make every effort to automatically perform compatibility checks for each accounts and set the appropriate Handler, it’s imperative for you to please do the compatibility tests from your end as well using the steps listed above, before 5/8/2014 .

4) Who can help me update my site/script to use a newer version of PHP?

While we can assist you with changing the version of PHP your script utilizes, we will not be able to recode your site to be compatible with newer versions of PHP. You should contact the script’s author/developer to inquire as to whether or not they currently have or plan to re-design their code to utilize later versions of PHP.

Best Regards,

Firstname Lastname

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.

Gratitude

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: I wrote this some years ago for my old blog; it was originally published with a different photo.

The Thanksgiving holiday understandably brings thoughts of gratitude, and fosters much charity.

I hope these thoughts of gratitude will continue for individuals throughout the next holiday season — which all too often becomes the season of marketing and materialism, with little room left for gratitude — and into the new year.

While I value the good actions and gratitude shown over the Thanksgiving holiday, gratitude must well from within every one of us, each day of our lives. All too often, we not only forget to express gratitude, but in our competitive, time-driven, negatively-focused world, but we fail to create the mental space necessary to recognize our own gratitude.

We are the ones who suffer, for without gratitude, life becomes dry. When we fail to recognize, value, and have gratitude for what truly matters to us, that which we overlook falls out of the spectrum of our life. When we are grateful, “What we appreciate, appreciates”, as Lynne Twist so concisely states.

We cultivate gratitude by paying attention to the small things in life, by making time to realize and express our gratitude, and by living our gratitude. As John F. Kennedy said, “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them.”

When the going gets rough, expressing and living with gratitude is not so easy. Many spiritual traditions remind us that tough times are not coincidences, or mistakes; difficulties in the path of life are opportunities provided so that we may grow and temper ourselves. We must practice meeting difficult times with the same gratitude we would meet good times. This has practical as well as spiritual benefits, as the following quote states:

When asked how things are, don’t whine and grumble about your hardships.  If you answer “Lousy, “ then God says, “You call this bad? I’ll show you what bad really is.” When asked how things are and, despite hardship or suffering, you answer, “Good,” then God says “You call this good?  I’ll show you what good really is!
~ Rabbi Nachman of Breslov

The world is having a difficult time, and we as individuals can make a difference in our own lives, and the lives of others by cultivating and expressing gratitude – not just on a designated holiday or event, but every day, in every aspect of our lives.

For what are you grateful? Can you ask yourself, and give thanks, every day?

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.

Ancient History: National Columnist, My First Job

From Kelly Manjula Koza’s archives: A scan of a piece I wrote for my first real job as a columnist for a national sports publication in the early 1980’s.

A month or so before I graduated high school, I was asked to write a regular column for a regional sports publication that was launching nationally. My only directive was that the column was to be “for junior athletes”. I accepted the offer, mused a bit, and a few weeks later, I sent in my first column — which I had typed on correctable paper using a mechanical typewriter and mailed in a stamped envelope. It was 1980, before personal computers, email, faxes, or cell phones!

A day later I received a call: The publisher wanted to know if I would be available to edit the entire paper, and yes, I would be paid for that as well as my column. After several days of contemplating this additional job offer — a little mind-blowing for a 16-year old kid who already felt in over her head as a “pro athlete”— I decided that the few days a week of driving nearly 60 miles across the metropolis to the newspaper office was not practical. 

Instead, I wrote more for the paper. Lots more. Over the course of two or three years, in addition to my monthly column, I penned so many player profiles, tournament recaps, and other features (and contributed a few not-so-good photos) that I soon insisted the publisher not put my by-line on anything except my column. I also edited, laid out, and ghost wrote columns for a few initial newsletters for the fledgeling women’s pro association, which started without staff and was run by collective volunteer effort at first.

Of the dozens of pieces published, I kept only the random column shown below and one feature. I don’t tend to save things, especially my own work, and in the years before scans were easy and photos were digital, I discarded almost all articles I had written that were published in newsprint, and did so without saving a copy. At times I wish I had saved more, as it would be interesting now to read what I had written then!

I do recall that the first column (which is not the one below) stated my ideal for the series: To inspire kids (and adults) to improve themselves, their physical and mental health and well-being, their playing ability, their love of sports, and their lives in general — and to play and live fairly and honestly. I was rather surprised at the number of adults who confided to me that my column was their favorite part of the paper. 

And yes, the first name in the byline and intro paragraph is blurred, as at that time I was called by a variation of the first name I was given at birth. The given name most definitely did not suit me and the nickname did not either. I legally changed my name some years later.

Written sometime between 1980 and 1982.

To see more of the archives, click here or select the blog category KMK Archives.